Blazers and ties. Typically what comes to mind when you think about school uniforms. Maybe for the UK, but not for the rest of the world.

Whether you like it or not school uniform is a big part of school life, and that is the same for so many children around the world. From traditional national costumes pre-dating the modern world, to a glimpse into the future of uniform, a uniform is there to provide kids with a sense of community and pride.

School uniforms have transformed over the years but have always been a staple within schools across the globe. Many have morphed to represent their cultures and traditions, and will continue to change as the world and generations grow. We’ve taken a look into the vast range of different uniforms from around the world and listed a few of our favourites.

Japanese students in traditional Japanese uniforms

Japan

The iconic uniforms used by Japanese schools were originally modeled on the European-style naval uniforms from the late 19th century, and have morphed into the stylised outfits we know today. Made up of male and female looks, the boy are dressed in smart military style jackets and trousers, whilst the girls model blouses with sailor style neckties and skirts which have become synonymous with Japanese culture. The uniform has now branched outside of the classroom and is commonly seen in the Anime scene and is used by many popular pop groups.

Christ's Hospital dress code

Christ’s Hospital, UK

Originally instated in 1553, the school uniform at Christ’s Hospital school in the UK has been recorded as one of the oldest school uniforms in existence, and hasn’t really changed since the Tudor period. Made up of a long blue coats, matching breeches, yellow knee length socks and white dress necktie, Christ Hospitals uniform is not what you think of when Western school uniforms come to mind. The uniforms are highly regarded by pupils with many saying they it is ‘a very important part of the School’s history and heritage’.

South Korean students in school uniforms

South Korea

Whilst South Korea school uniforms are made up of similar components as the traditional Western uniform, blazers, shirt and tie, they seem to carry a little extra flare. Taking inspiration from Japanese culture, South Korean school children utilise their uniforms as another form of self-expression, pushing the fashion boundaries into the future. Many uniform manufacturers and schools promote their garments through celebrity endorsement and fashion-forward advertising, making uniform part of South Korea’s popular culture.

Vietnamese students in Ao Dai

Vietnam

Adopted by Hue Dong Khanh Girls High School in 1917, the Ao Dai has become a staple in girls uniforms across Vietnam. Traditionally seen as the national Vietnamese costume, the Ao Dai is made up of a fitted tunic and wide leg trousers and is most commonly seen in white. Finished with a conical hat, Ao Dai supporters argue the traditional clothing teaches girls to be feminine and modest, whilst remaining sedate with a refined manner in the modernising world.

Indonesian students in uniform

Indonesia

Although private schools across Indonesia have their own dress code, the majority of public schools adopt the same uniform for each pupil. Made up of three distinctive look, the Indonesian public school uniform each resemble a similar look. Sekolah Dasar (primary pupils) wear a short sleeved white shirt and either red shorts or skirts, whilst Sekolah Menengah Pentama (junior pupils) and Sekolah Menengah Atas (secondary pupils) wear white shirts with navy or grey-blue shorts or skirts respectively. With a mixture of religions across Indonesia, schools guarantee freedom of religion and invite students to follow their religious dress code should they wish to do so.

Students in uniform in Pakistan

Pakistan

Uniforms are compulsory in the majority of schools in Pakistan and many have mandated them. Boys typically wear light-coloured shirts and trousers in brown and blue, and girls often wear a Shalwar Qameez, the national dress of Pakistan in similar light colours. Some schools allow girls to wear shirts and skirts as an alternative.

Price & Buckland have been manufacturing and designing school uniforms for over 60 years. Why not take a look at our primary and secondary collection and see if we can help you with your schools requirements.

 

 

Please allow up to 12 working days for dispatch on all uniform orders, and an additional 2-5 days for delivery via Royal Mail.

Thanks, The P&B team.